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Category Archives: Joe Girardi

Yankees 2013: A Ghostly Team

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YankeeStadium

Derek Jeter: Broken ankle still not healed, on 60-day DL. A-Rod: Hip surgery during off-season, on 60-day DL. Curtis Granderson, fractured forearm, on 15-day DL. Mark Teixeira, strained right wrist, 15-day DL. Francisco Cervelli, fractured right hand, playing it day-by-day. Ivan Nova, triceps inflammation, 60-day DL. Joba Chamberlain, strained right oblique, 15-day DL. David Robertson, sore left hamstring, day by day. Kevin YouKillUs (yes, the former Red Sox guy), lumbar spine strain, 15-day DL.

Enough?derek-jeter

Bear in mind that most of these guys have been on the DL since before Opening Day, so they haven’t played yet this year at all. More important, those 15 or 60 DL days are frequently extended once they’re up. Jeter, for instance, spent most of the off-season with his ankle in a brace, riding around his mansion on a scooter.  He was expected to play come April 1st but has yet to swing a bat other than in practice—and after seeing him hanging around the dugout, I think he’d best get himself on a weight reduction plan, stat!

Yesterday, May 4th, I watched a complete game for the first time this season. It took me a month to face the sight of my beloved team replaced by a former Red Sox player and a bunch of strangers. Yankee Stadium was half empty—unprecedented—so apparently I’m not alone. I knew precisely four of the guys in the lineup. It was like watching the A’s—who in fact they were playing—at the start of every new season when they’ve invariably been overhauled. I knew just

Joe Torre

Joe Torre

two of their players–but that’s not unusual. When Joe Torre managed the Yankees I could easily recite the rarely changed lineup. It isn’t my aging brain cells at fault; it’s the players’ aging process. That and demented management.

Despite the Yankees’ decimation-by-injury, they’re doing all right. Except for Nova’s recent injury, the pitching rotation seems to be in good shape. Yesterday Phil Hughes threw eight scoreless innings. The Yankees won 4-2, but the score leaped there from 4-0 as soon as a reliever came in. Joe Girardi did the right thing for once, and immediately called in Mariano Rivera. (He’s got 11 Minnesota Twins v New York Yankeessaves so far in what he’s declared will be his final season.) Robinson Cano is on the top ten MLB home run list  with 8, and he has an OBP of 352 and a 309 average.  They’ve won 17 games and lost 11, putting them in second place in AL East. The Red Sox are ahead with 20 wins, riding the wave of good will in the wake of the intense emotions swirling around Boston. (Not saying they’re doing anything wrong, just that some of the love pouring over Boston after the marathon bombing spills naturally over the Sox, who are so closely identified with the city, state and just about all of New England.)

A few ranting words at management for dumping Nick Swisher and Raoul Ibanez are in order. Instead we now have Lyle Overbay and Travis Hafner, both baseball elders even though we constantly hear that the Yankees desperately

Lyle Overbay

Lyle Overbay

need young blood.

Still, if the guys can do as well as they are with a Red Sox and strangers, just imagine what’ll happen when the Old Guard returns, well rested and ready to kick ass!

English: Cap logo of the New York Yankees

Sounding the Death Knell for Mo

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Already the media have him dead and buried.

To backtrack: The day before yesterday Mariano Rivera hit the wall while shagging fly balls the way he always does before a game. He fell to the ground grabbing his knee, his face contorted in pain. Time froze. Everyone who saw what was happening processed the moment in their own way; whatever that was, no member of the Yankee organization was unmoved. Everyone knew this was major.

from Yahoo:
“Oh my god,” Alex Rodriguez, standing next to the batting cage, said on video shown by the YES Network. “Oh my god.”

Girardi ran toward the outfield. Bullpen coach Mike Harkey whistled for help. Girardi and Harkey lifted Rivera onto a cart that whisked him away, his body and affect limp. Initial tests in the clubhouse gave Girardi hope no ligaments had blown. On the bench, Rivera’s teammates kept asking for updates. Finally, one arrived: torn ACL, torn meniscus, each to be verified by doctors in New York, both almost a certainty to be so.

“It’s bad,” Yankees captain Derek Jeter said. “It’s bad.”

Two days later, we know that Rivera suffered a torn ACL that will require surgery and has been known to keep ordinary players out of commission for a season or more. Mariano Rivera, however, is no ordinary player. He’s been telling everyone that he has no intention of being forced into retirement, that he’ll be back in 2013, if not sooner. He was expected to retire after this year, but, he says, he wants to go out “from the mound” in victory, not defeat.

David Robertson and Rafael Soriano are moving up in the back end of the Yankees’ bullpen, with Robertson most likely to inherit Rivera’s ninth inning role (as if anyone could replace him). Robertson seems to have been being groomed for the part already; it’s just that nobody expected he’d have to be ready so suddenly.

It’s serious. It’s somber. It’s sobering. But Mariano Rivera is a gentle giant who can do what others only dream of doing. It’s possible he’ll be ready to play before the end of this season, say, during post-season. The media should just stop acting like it’s all over. Stop with the hand-wringing and chest pounding, and get with the awesome guts and determination of the best closer in baseball history.

A Month of Baseball

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In looking at the significant (to me, that is) baseball events of April 2012 as a diehard Yankee fan, I cannot resist calling attention to the plight of the Red Sox, who are hanging out down in the basement of the AL East Coast division. Another of my least favorite teams, the LA Angels, are moldering in the West Coast basement. That’s more shocking than the Sox, considering that the Angels landed Albert Pujols and pitcher CJ Wilson; WTF more do they need?

The New York Yankees

Unfortunately, the Yankees aren’t exactly flying high.

Pitching Problems: Back in November, just after the 2011 season ended, Joe Girardi, who apparently comes from the Don’t Worry Be Happy school of management, bragged to the media that he already had his pitching rotation for 2012. No problemo, amigos. Right away I knew we were in trouble: Yankee scouts weren’t out beating the bushes and fields, looking for new pitchers to replace Phil Hughes and AJ Burnett. Thus the inevitable came to pass: two of the starters, Hughes and Freddy Garcia, are inconsistent to the point of incompetence and, more importantly, loss. The good news is that we do have one ace (CC Sabathia), another pitcher who stands a chance of becoming one (Ivan Nova), high hopes with the new Hiroki Kuroda, and the soon-to-return Good Ol’ Reliable Andy Pettitte. It’s actually a lot of good news, and if I were managing I’d just rotate the four good guys and unceremoniously dump Hughes and Garcia. Why a team needs five starters anyway is a mystery to me; it’s pitcher pampering in the extreme.

I know every fan thinks they can manage better than the manager, but my frustration with Girardi is only now manifesting in that way. I’m just beginning to notice that one of his flaws is that he coddles the players. He was resting A-Rod and Jeter during the first week of play, rotating the DH between them and a few other older guys. Sometimes Girardi’s just plain clueless: for instance, everybody knows Mark Texeira doesn’t warm up to full capacity until after the first month, and probably won’t hit much of anything in April. In the meantime, Nick Swisher leads the league in extra-base hits. Logic says to move Swish ahead of Tex in the lineup right? This doesn’t seem to have occurred to Girardi. So we get situations like bases loaded with two outs, Tex at bat , he strikes out and strands the runners. Now, if Swish had been at that spot in the lineup…you get my drift.

After a month of baseball: The Yankees have a record of 13 wins, 9 losses and are in second place in the American League Eastern Division,  behind the Baltimore Orioles and Tampa Bay Rays, who are tied for 1st place.

New York Mets

The Mets are playing like quintessential Mets. For instance, in Sunday’s game against The Colorado Rockies they were winning 5-0 until in 9th inning—yes, I said the ninth inning—when they allowed the Rockies to score exactly five—yes, I said 5—home runs to tie the game. They went into extra innings, going eleven total to win by a run. Yes, they did win it—but just look at what they had to put themselves through to do it! Typical Mets behavior.

And a bit of bad luck to boot: Pitcher Mike Pelfrey, it was announced today, needs Tommy John surgery, which puts him out of commission for the season, possibly longer.

After a month of baseball: The METS have 13 wins and 10 losses, and remain behind the Atlanta Braves in the NL East Coast Division.

San Francisco Giants

The lovable Freak Tim Lincecum  had a lousy start for the first time in his career. In 5 starts he has 2 wins and 2 losses, and his ERA is a ghastly 5.74. Maybe now he knows what it feels like to live in Barry Zito’s skin. Speaking of Zito, in his first 2012 start he pitched a shutout! I hope he was as overjoyed as I was. He didn’t collapse after that, either: he won 2 and lost one. Keep it up, Barry! Maybe you’ll work your way back to your glory days. Buster Posey did: he’s blowing everyone away by playing just as great as he did last year, before he was crippled by that bone crunching crash at home plate.

After a month of baseball: the SF GIANTS have a record of 12 wins and 10 losses, and remain in 2nd  place in the National League Western Division, 3½  games behind the Los Angeles Dodgers (who, by the way, appear to have gotten an injection of new life from Magic Johnson’s ownership).

Oakland Athletics

True Confession: I haven’t paid attention to the A’s at all this season. My enthusiasm for them was once high, but as players kept getting traded away, I steadily lost interest. I don’t know any of the players on the team anymore. I am relentlessly bitter towards Billy Beane for his ruthless management.  Maybe I’ll have more to say at the end of May, after I go to the Colisseum to watch them play my guys. For now, these are  the dry facts:

After a month of baseball the A’s have 11 wins and 13 losses, and are tied with the Seattle Mariners for 2nd place in the American League Western Division.

Yankees v. Posada: Tossing The Catcher

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It began last season, although we didn’t realize just what was beginning, when A.J. Burnett demanded his own personal catcher, saying he couldn’t work with 15-year veteran Jorge Posada. At the end of the season, we were told Jorge wouldn’t be catching at all in 2011 but would be in the lineup as DH. Alarming as this was, we still didn’t get what was happening. It is only now, after Posada’s been benched, apparently forever, that it’s become eminently clear: the Yankee super structure is trying to get rid of him. Is this any way to treat a player who’s been with the organization 15 years, one of the “Core Four” who played together longer than any other teammates in any sport, a catcher who’s run the games, the locker room and the team almost as much as the Captain? You bet your ass it isn’t!

The general public became aware  something strange was brewing a few months ago, when Jorge pulled himself from the lineup rather than bat ninth, which must’ve felt like the ultimate humiliation — plus who knows what preceded that move by Joe Girardi? Suddenly the media was all over the story of Posada v. Yankees. Everyone had something to say, my favorite comment, as I wrote, being the one made by Red Sox DH David Ortiz, which was, in part,  “You’re going to tell me that Posada can’t catch a game out there? Come on, man…that is a good hitter. I don’t care what anybody says.

Since then, Posada’s been making a huge effort to contribute to the team, but, unfortunately, his efforts haven’t borne much fruit: in 90 games this season, he’s hitting .230, as compared to his career .273 mark. A few days ago manager Joe Girardi informed Posada he is no longer the DH player. From now on, it’s likely that Eric Chavez will be DH against right-handed pitchers, and Andruw Jones against lefties. Chavez, himself a veteran, feels awkward being in this position: “I’m not trying to replace anyone or anything like that,” he said. “I’ll just do whatever they need me to do.”

No doubt it’s withdrawal from catching that’s to blame for Posada’s poor performance…but people like Joe Girardi, Brian Cashman and Hal Steinbrenner don’t give a shit about reasons, they care about one thing only: WINning. (Actually, they care only for money, but in baseball it amounts to the same thing.)

Even if it is time for Posada to leave, the Yankees could and should be doing it in a much classier way, instead of behaving even worse than they did when Joe Torre got the boot.  Their biggest rival, the Red Sox, treat their own a lot better: When Mike Lowell left them last year, he was celebrated with Mike Lowell Day and other sentimental rituals. Jason Varitek, who’ll be leaving after this season, is still catching a few games, and serving as consultant to the newbies. I don’t recall any big ceremonies when the most recent long-time Yankees, Paul O’Neill and Tino Martinez, left, but at least they weren’t mistreated. Then again, Bernie Williams simply disappeared, with rumors buzzing.

They could have let Posada catch a few games this season; I don’t believe he’s suddenly incapable of it. Instead, he sits on the bench looking miserable. My heart breaks for him–and so do many others. Here are a few comments  from around the Internet.

From ESPN Online by Stephen A. Smith : Humiliated but not humbled, the veteran should take the high road — unlike the Yankees…Now it’s up to Posada to remind them of how it should be done.It’s up to Posada to point out all the maneuvers that have been used against him and to elocute the classless way this organization has acted toward him at times. It’s up to Posada, the catcher with 270 career homers and a lifetime .273 batting average, to remind the Yankees that he wasn’t just a spectator during those four World Series championships.

From the Wall Street Journal by Daniel Barbarisi: It is the lowest moment in a humbling season for the 39-year-old Posada, as he was stripped of his catcher’s job, then removed as DH against left-handed pitchers, and now, finally, taken out of the starting lineup completely.

From Mass. Live.com, by Ron ChimelisRed Sox fans should take no delight in the sad farewell of Jorge Posada…Joe Girardi has said he knew he might be in charge when the day came that the team’s resident icons would hit the wall erected by Father Time. For Posada, it has come with a vengeance. 

His last two months will be spent on the bench, and no matter what anyone says, a player cannot lead a team from there.

This is significant, because for as much leadership as Derek Jeter has given the Yankees, Posada has been at least as much his team’s heart and soul, and maybe more.The Yankees will go on, but they are losing something of value. 

So are those of us who love baseball and the men who represent it well, no matter what uniform they wear.

Saying goodbye is never easy, and some people are worse at it than others. Still, there’s no excuse for what the Yankees are doing. Right now I’m watching them bury the Anaheim Angels, but I’m less than jubilant. Every so often the camera zeroes in on Posada, sitting alone on the bench with his teammates out in the field, his face wearing an expression of defeat. I hope, as one writer above suggested, he decides to walk away before they do any worse to him.

Jorge Posada is my favorite ball player. I’m not so sure I’ll remain a Yankee fan once he’s gone, if how I feel watching this game is any indication.  I’ll have to kiss my hometown boys goodbye, and take the last leap West: after 23 years in the Bay Area I’ll finally become a Giants fan.

More DL Posts on Posada:

We Stand Behind Jorge
The Beauty of Love: Book Review
Posada Hits Grand Slam
Adding Insult to Injury
Posada: Perfect
The Man Behind the Plate
Vote for Jorge!

Good God! I didn’t realize I’d written so much about him. Ya think he’s my favorite player? Is this excessive?!

We Stand Behind Jorge

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Yankee catchers: Martin, Posada, Cervelli

If you’re a Yankee fan, or even just a casual observer of baseball, then you heard about this weekend’s dustup, which the media upgraded to a tornado, surrounding Jorge Posada.  Briefly, Posada arrived at the stadium Saturday to find he was batting ninth, and one hour before game time told Manager Joe Girardi he was unable to play, for reasons left murkily undefined. This story, however, actually began at the end of last season, when Posada was told he’d be relieved of his catching duties and become the Designated Hitter for 2011. At 39, he’d been showing signs of slippage.

The Yankee’s Number One catcher since 1995, Posada is one of the Core Four, who, along with Derek Jeter, Andy Pettitte, and Mariano Rivera, are the only group of athletes in any sport in history to have played together on the same team for 16 consecutive seasons. (Pettitte missed three of those seasons with the Yankees while playing for his hometown Houston Astros from 2004 through ’06.) They have won five world championships together.

Pettitte recently retired, and over the course of the next few years, the other three will inevitably follow suit, making this a sad and bumpy transitional time for them, the team, and their fans. Anyone with the least bit of emotional intelligence would expect problems to arise and try to minimize the damage. Joe Torre, for instance, would certainly have anticipated the challenge, and managed it with grace. So would almost every woman I know. Unfortunately, Brian Cashman, the Steinbrenner kids, and Joe Girardi don’t get high points for emotional intelligence.

I don’t know what goes on in the back rooms of baseball, but I’d wager a hefty bet that they don’t weigh in psychological fallout when making big decisions. The cruel mistake here was in yanking Jorge from behind the plate all at once, when his attachment to being a catcher is fierce; even physiologically speaking, it must be enmeshed in the marrow of his bones after all these years. He should have been gently weaned by being allowed to catch a few games this year. Because psychological fallout wasn’t taken into consideration, it’s now affecting team performance — borne out by the disheartening Red Sox weekend sweep.

After Jorge took himself out of Saturday’s game and sat down in the dugout looking suicidal, Laura Posada tweeted the world that Jorge had been complaining of a bad back, and, oh, by the way, ”he loves being a Yankee.” My previously high esteem for Ms. Posada, based on how she’s dealing with the challenges of raising a disabled child, immediately sagged: unless Jorge asked her to do it, which I doubt, her intervention made him look bad. He never said he had back troubles, in fact, he admitted a need to “clear my head.” The little woman’s interjections – and she became “the little woman” the minute she insinuated herself into the situation – fanned the flames of nonstop media speculations that went on relentlessly for the next 24 hours.

Not surprisingly, Red Sox fans could hardly contain themselves, expressing their joy in nasty comments all over the Internet. They should’ve taken a cue from their favorite player, David Ortiz (Big Papi), their own Designated Hitter:

“I’m going to tell you what I think. They’re doing that guy wrong. They’re doing him wrong. You know why? Because that guy, he is legendary right there in that organization. And dude, DHing [stinks]…from what I heard, they told him from the very beginning that you’re not even going to catch bullpens, that straight up starts messing with your head. You’re going to tell me that Posada can’t catch a game out there? Come on, man. Now, I got used to this because I got no choice, but I can imagine how hard it has to be for him. This is a guy that is a good hitter. I don’t care what anybody says.”

With those heartfelt, humane words Big Papi just entered into my small circle of favorite players. Smart, insightful, and respectful, he has more compassion in his big toe than many so-called Yankee fans, of the younger persuasion no doubt, who are calling for Posada’s retirement, ‘dissing his age, performance slippage, and “diva” behavior.

That was Saturday. At Sunday night’s game, true Yankee fans proved their loyalty with a sign reading, “We Stand Behind Jorge.” The “Bleacher Creatures,” a bunch of guys who at every game do roll call of on-field players only, made an exception for Jorge: After finishing their attendance check with A-Rod, they chanted “Jorge, Jorge” and got an appreciative wave back from his place in the dugout. In the eighth inning Posada was sent in to pinch-hit for Andruw Jones, and the crowd gave him a standing ovation. He drew a walk against Red Sox reliever Daniel Bard, who later said, “I think that’s pretty cool that they’re sstanding behind him, but I still wanted to get him out.”

When the 2011 season opened, the Yankees charged the gates, bats blazing, and until a week ago were firing on all cylinders, at first place in the division. But their performance has steadily diminished, and a few days ago Tampa Bay leap-frogged right over them. Posada’s at-bat average was under .150, as opposed to his lifetime average of  .273, with a high of .338 in 2007. Still,  I didn’t realize it had been affecting the whole team. This weekend it became obvious that it has.

Captain Jeter, Jorge’s best friend, said,  “He’s a brother — we’ve been together a long time. If I thought he did something wrong, I’d be the first one to tell him.” Jeter himself is none too dazzling this season: his average is 260, and if I never see another groundout from him I still will have seen too many. Someone pointed out that Jeter is playing under circumstances similar to Posada, with retirement on the horizon, yet he’s not acting like a “pouty diva.” But if Jeter isn’t showing any emotional wear and tear, it’s probably because he’s not quite as attached to being a shortstop as Posada is to catching. Besides, Posada’s nature is that of a highly sensitive person; it’s like comparing apples and oranges.

Catching is, in my opinion, one of the hardest jobs in baseball. The physical position alone is enough to kill you. And this is the guy who tells the pitcher what to throw and when: he’s key to the progression and outcome of the game. I’ve always admired catchers, even more than pitchers, and Jorge Posada is my favorite player. He’s not glamorous like Jeter or A-Rod, not flashy or adventurous or given to grandstanding. He is in fact anything but a diva.  My affinity for him deepened even further when he and Laura had a son with craniosynostosis. Having been through a similar experience myself, I read their book and wrote them a letter in response, enclosing my own book on the subject, Perfectly Normal.

I’m fully confident that Posada will emerge from all this with his dignity intact. Losing his place and identity as a catcher is a significantly big deal, but it is, after all, neither the most difficult nor the most painful life experience that Jorge Posada has ever faced.

Other Yankee Notes

Friday night’s game with the Red Sox was the 2,048th time the rivals faced each other on the field.

The Yankees have made 26 errors this season, one of the highest in MLB. In a typical sloppy move, the ball came dribbling down the field heading straight for A-Rod, who casually bent over, his mind obviously somewhere else, and let it roll past his glove and through his legs while the hitter took first base.

The Yankees’ team average is .292, with only Eric Chavez and Felix Nunoz batting over 300.

Will Eric Chavez turn out to be this year’s Nick Johnson? You might not remember Nick, so brief was his tenure last season, when he hurt his wrist in May and stayed out the rest of the season. Chavez, who came over from the A’s this year, promptly pulled something or other and is on the DL. Having spent his last few Athletic seasons on the list, I don’t expect to see him again at Yankee Stadium.

Pitching: Yankees have a pitching problem for at least the third consecutive year. With the exception of C.C. Sabathia, none of the starters are completely reliable. Bartolo Colon, as well as A.J. Burnett, is inconsistent, and he’s also one of those maddeningly S-L-O pitchers who lengthen the game – as if it needs lengthening! – with long pauses between pitches. Worse, however, is that Colon frequently wears a blank face, giving the impression he’s not completely there. Phil Hughes is on the DL. Meanwhile, Girardi lets all of them stay in the game well beyond the bounds of decent performance. I guess he’s busy deciding who’s going to catch…uh oh, don’t get me started again!

Let’s hope for better news next week!

 

Hot Stove in The Wintertime

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Baseball with clock to represent a "curre...

Image via Wikipedia

Yanks Lose Lee

Cliff Lee either has more integrity than most baseball players, or he’s a doofus; I have a feeling it’s the former. Lee did what few baseball players ever do: he turned down more money and the chance to be a New York Yankee in favor of returning to the Phillies, the team he loves.

The Yanks made no bones about wanting Lee, and it would’ve been a great acquisition, considering that last season’s pitching rotation of CC Sabathia, Phil Hughes, Andy Pettitte, and JJ Burnett contributed to a dismal post-season. Sabathia’s an ace pitcher, and Andy’s as reliable as ever – but both had their off days in 2010, while Hughes and Burnett, especially the latter, stank. Which is not to say the rest of the team were much better: except for Robinson Cano, who was almost the league’s MVP of the year, they were a sad sight. Still, you know what they say: good pitching wins the game. And 2010 was the Year of the Pitcher, when other teams’ aces pulled off some astounding feats.

That’s why Brian Cashman’s attitude about losing Lee is so baffling – and so maddening.  “I really don’t think we’ve got a lot of holes,” he said, referring to the rotation. “We’ve got one of the best in the league in CC. We’ve got a kid who won 18 games for us last year in Phil Hughes. And I really believe that A.J. Burnett is going to bounce back for us next year.”

Groan. That inane mantra about Burnett was repeated endlessly last year, to no avail. The Cash Man’s remarks are sour grapes and, worse, they reek of laziness. I was under the assumption that the Yankees’ top priority during the off season would be to resolve their pitching problem. I wonder if they’re pursuing anyone else now that Lee rejected them.  I also wonder what the ineffectual Girardi thinks of the situation. I get the sense that the whole staff is lackadaisical. Which leads me to what’s really on my mind vis-a-vis the NY Yankees: George’s departure into the ether. Clichés are so true:  You don’t miss your water till the well runs dry and You don’t know what you got till it’s gone.

If King George was still around, it’s quite possible the Yankees would have snagged Lee. Someone would have persuaded him to say yes, either his good friend Sabathia, or Cashman, or Girardi, or the scouts who do this sort of thing. While they offered Lee the usual mega-bucks, money, as was proven here once more, is not everything, not even when it comes to the Yankees. When George Steinbrenner wanted a player, by god, he got him.  He pushed and pressed and flogged everyone until they sweat their balls off and the deed was done.

Unfortunately, George’s heirs, Hal and Hank, don’t seem to give a damn. Nor do they have the vaguest notion as to how their father did what he did. Those negotiations with Derek Jeter, for instance, were downright shameful, and I am seriously concerned about the future of the team. Will the House that Ruth Built and the team that George maintained come undone over the next few years? To quote the kid in Angels in the Outfield, Hey, it could happen.

SF Giants Rule

Meanwhile, I’m lucky to have other baseball pleasures to keep me from a Yankee-induced meltdown. These pleasures are closer to home – to my current home, that is, not my heart-home in the Bronx. In the Bay Area I’m smack dab in the middle of the place that in 2010 witnessed one of the most dramatic World Series in the history of the game. Up until now, though I swear I tried, I just couldn’t get into the Giants. Couldn’t stand Barry Bonds, yet once he left, the team lacked charisma. I’ve been in love with Barry Zito for years, but his Giants performance has brought mostly heartache. For a few years I followed the A’s, but with Billy Beane relentlessly decimating the team, I couldn’t stick it out; it was too gut-wrenching to watch players leave every other week.

And then along came the 2010 Giants, suddenly making headlines in September. I perked up, tuned in, and saw charisma to spare. I don’t have to tell anyone what a thrilling WS it was, or how much fun these guys were, or how the city went insane with joy. I watched one WS game from a café near the stadium, and another third of a game from the back fence where you’re allowed to stand for up to three innings. Thus, I was among the crazy partying crowds – and nobody knows how to party like San Francisco. When it was all over, I realized that in 2011 I’ll actually have a home team to root for! I’ve purchased tickets to one Giants game and now I’m waiting for a friend who knows someone who knows someone who sells her season tickets at face value.

Matsui Comes to Oakland

But the Grand Slam came yesterday, when Hideki Matsui, ex-Yankee and the sexiest Godzilla from Japan, with his dimpled smile and twitching shoulders, signed with the Oakland A’s as DH. Now I have to buy some A’s tickets (I usually go see them once a year when they play the Yankees). All the Bay Bridge games are a must. I don’t know how I’ll afford to support my baseball habit with this sudden embarrassment of riches; but I’ll also be able to see the games on local TV, something I don’t get to do as a Yankee fan. It’s going to be  busy baseball season. Only 105 days till it starts!

Yankees v. Rangers Game 3

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Mariano Rivera

Image by Keith Allison via Flickr

I don’t usually rant and rave publicly during baseball games, but then, I’ve never been as violently pissed off during a game as I am now. Texas Rangers scored 2 in the first inning, nobody’s scored since then on either team. Theoretically the Yankees might’ve caught up, even in the 9th inning–except that in the top of the 9th Manager Joe Girardi didn’t being in closing pitcher Mariano Rivera, who would’ve shut them down, and the Rangers scored another 4 runs….and are still swinging. Why didn’t he bring in Rivera? WTF knows? I never know why Girardi does anything he does. I just wish George Steinbrenner were still alive and came down to the field and fired Joe right now on the spot. Girardi doesn’t seem to give a shit if his team wins or loses.

The score is 7-0.

Yesterday I wrote a song about Girardi with the line, “Won’t You Please Go to Chicago, Joe Girardi.” The Cubs want him to come manage them, let him go. I’ll pay his fare.

The score is  8-0.

Is Joe enjoying watching this massacre? Where is Mariano?

At last, the top of the inning’s over.

Next Day: Jane Heller says much the same thing, only much more calmly and eloquently.

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