RSS Feed

On Reading: Quotations

Posted on

jonahreading

I collect memorable quotations on everything from sex to humor to writing. These are all on the joy of reading. 

What better way to grow up and mature through life than accompanied by great novels to show us the way?–Lucy Horner.

Just the knowledge that a good book is awaiting one at the end of a long day makes that day happier. ~ Kathleen Norris

Be careful of reading health books. You may die of a misprint.—Mark TwainMarkTwain

When you reread a classic you do not see more in the book than you did before; you see more in you than there was before. ~ Thomas Carlyle

A book is like a piece of rope; it takes on meaning only in connection with the things it holds together. ~ Norman Cousins

I read the newspaper avidly. It is my one form of continuous fiction.~ Aneurin Bevan 

A novel is never anything but a philosophy put into images.—~ Albert Camus 

The flood of print has turned reading into a process of gulping rather than savoring—Warren Chappell

The great American novel has not only already been written, it has already been rejected.~ Frank Dane 

Never judge a book by its movie.~ J. W. Eagan ~

People say that life is the thing, but I prefer reading.~ Logan Pearsall Smith ~

Why pay a dollar for a bookmark? Why not use the dollar for a bookmark?~ Fred Stoller ~

No matter how busy you may think you are, you must find time for reading, or surrender yourself to self-chosen ignorance.~ Atwood H. Townsend ~

“Every reader, as he reads, is actually the reader of himself. The writer’s work is only a kind of optical instrument he provides the reader so he can discern what he might never have seen in himself without this book. –Proust

Baseball Identity Crisis

Posted on

yankees

Born in the Bronx, I lived all over New York State until 1988, when I moved to the SF Bay Area. I’ve never lost my New York accent—in fact, it’s intensified—and I never gave up rooting for the Yankees. Until now.

Ever since the firing of Joe Torre and the demise of George (“Evil Emperor”) Steinbrenner, I’ve grown increasingly frustrated, angry, and disgusted with the NY Yankees. It’s not just because their playing went downhill; I am not a “fair weather fan.” It’s because I can’t stand Torre’s successor, Joe Girardi, and disagree with most of his decisions; and because the Steinbrenner kids who are running things don’t give a shit about the team as long as the money keeps pouring in. These changes have resulted in more frequent player turnover: management doesn’t care enough to hold on to good players the way Torre and George S. did. To top things off, during the past four or five years several of the best, most beloved players retired, including Jorge Posada, Andy Pettit, Mariano Rivera, and Derek Jeter (the Core Four, who played together for 16 years, longer than any other group in any sport).

English: Jorge Posada (#20, left) with Mariano...

Jorge Posada (#20, left) with Mariano Rivera (middle) and Derek Jeter (right) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

While the Yankees were deteriorating, the SF Giants, post-Barry Bonds, kept winning World Series. They cohered into a rowdy team of individual eccentrics. Bruce Bochy is today considered the best manager in MLB. His core philosophy is like the old Yankee credo: hang on to good players to grow a tight and stellar working team. Living in their territory, it made perfect sense for me to become a Giants fan, and at the close of the 2014 season, with SF once again World Champions, I decided to make the move.

I reiterate: I am not a “bandwagon fan,” or a “fair weather fan.” I made this decision based on logic and geography. Following the Giants, I can see their games and read about them in the local paper, while Yankees’ televised games are few and far between. Because there’s no time change, the games reach me earlier in the day. Another bonus: at the Giants stadium there’s a back fence where they actually allow viewers to stand and watch three innings of the game for free; I’ve done it several times.

So here we are at the start of the 2015 season. I watched the Yankee opener on Monday, mainly to see Joe Torre throw the ceremonial pitch. I listened to the first two Giants games on radio. And I am deeply into an identity crisis. The whole thing feels weird. I am still, after all these years, a displaced New Yorker, a girl from the Bronx, and I’m not sure I’ll manage this transition. But I’m determined to try.

GiantsWin

Intelligent Comedy: The Internship

Posted on

The-Intership-300x171An intelligent comedy is hard to find. Despite the fact that most critics dissed The Internship, I found it hilarious, socially relevant, and full of heart.

Vince Vaughn is one of my favorite celebrity guys, and The Wedding Crashers, his first comedy with Owen Wilson, had me rolling on the floor every time I watched it (3). I actually didn’t expect that much from The Internship, thinking they couldn’t pull it off a second time. But this movie is more than a comedy: it’s a hilarious send-up of the way we live now—attached to our technological gadgets—and a way of life—basically, experiencing the world and other people first-hand—that’s rapidly fading.

The critics didn’t think it was funny, and they slammed the movie as being gaga for Google. But in fact, Google probably is the best workplace on Earth—and I’ve known people who work there—with its free food, nap rooms, and other unheard of perks. Of course the place borders on being cultish—but this was clearly on display in The Internship.

My guess is that those trashing The Internship just didn’t get it: either they’re too young to relate to Vaughn’s and Wilson’s aging characters, or they’re older and resent their portrayal as clueless geezers. That these guys are tech and pop-culture clueless is indisputable: but as an even older person, I didn’t understand tons of references thrown out by the Google kids. Vaughn’s and Wilson’s characters were entirely believable to me—and not insulting.

Of course, this is not the first time I’ve been wildly at odds with the critics: Ishtar, a 1980s comedy that’s still held up as the lowest form of film creation, had me laughing my ass off. And in another genre, I recently saw Gravity, praised to the skies for its “amaaaaazing” scenic effects, but which had a totally lame “plot” ; when it was over I thought, “That’s the stupidest thing I’ve ever seen.” (And hey, you don’t kill off George Clooney midway through a movie!)

vince-vaughn-picture-3But I digress; back to The Internship. Just about every movie I’ve seen with Vaughn is loaded with heart—not sentimental drivel, either, but a depth of love and caring that can pull any story through. He not only co-stars in The Internship; he co-wrote the script. On a totally irrelevant note, most people know VV only as a comic actor, but before he became funny he acted in serious films; anyone who has not seen Return to Paradise should. It’s a moving drama about friendship, love, and personal integrity.

I am intentionally saying almost nothing about the plot of The Internship because it’s unnecessary; the movie is two years old and anyone can Google up the story. Just don’t believe the idiotic comments and negative reviews: this film is well worth seeing if you want to laugh and learn.

 

Poverty

Posted on


Poverty

 

When you’re poor
you live on the highway.
Every stop
looks better than the last.

You learn to decipher
blessings in disaster,
relate deeds of devastation
in six amusing voices,
cultivate several zany images
and one of deprivation.

Shielding your eyes from the sun
one day, you look down the highway
trying to see the last dangerous curve
you traversed and discover that

the highway has become
your permanent habitat.

English: Typical Indian National Highway.

Wikipedia

 

 

Baseball Players’ Superstitions

baseball heartBaseball just might be the sport with the most superstitious lot of players. Bleacher Report lists the top 50 strangest. Here’s a sampling:

jason-giambi-1-sized

Jason Giambi puts on a gold thong whenever he’s in a slump.

Moises Alou pees on his batting gloves, supposedly to make  them tougher, when he is in a slump.

Mark Teixeira  developed a recent superstition when a sock of CC Sabathia’s  accidentally ended up in his locker, Mark had unknowingly put on one sock with the correct  #25, and one with the #52, and didn’t notice until the game had started; after he had one of the better games of his career—two home runs and six RBI’s—he decided to don two different sox in all future games.mark-teixeira-540x370

Hitters often like to get close to their bats. Occasionally this will occur with pitchers as well. Pitcher R.A. Dickey takes his choice of bats very seriously, naming  each one of them with creative monikkers.

Turk Wendell, who signed a contract with the Mets in 2000 for $ 9,999,999.99,took 99 as his player number.

Tim Lincecum wore the same cap his first five  seasons in MLB.210px-Tim_Lincecum_2008

Wade Boggs would take batting practice at precisely 5:17 when plating at night. He would also take  150 grounders, no more and no less, during warm-ups.

 BaseballFanBy the way, we fans are just as superstitious: I’m not the only one who worries my team lost because I failed to watch them, or is sure when I’m on the case they’re apt to win!

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 695 other followers